Magnificent Whirlpools and Maelstroms: The Nature’s Own Jacuzzis

One of the first legends to be recorded was that of Charybdis, a whirlpool in the Strait of Messina between the Italian mainland and the island of Sicily. In Homer’s Odyssey, written in the eighth century B.C., Charybdis is represented as a sea monster sucking and belching forth water as it preys on passing ships.

Magnificent Whirlpools and Maelstroms: The Nature’s Own Jacuzzis

By Mr Ghaz, February 13, 2011

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Magnificent Whirlpools and Maelstroms: The Nature’s Own Jacuzzis

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Before the word whirlpool became associated with the relaxing bath that Candido Jacuzzi invented, it struck terror into the hearts of many, especially seafarers. In the 19th century, Edgar Allan Poe expressed the awe generated by ocean whirlpools in his description of the famed Maelstrom, off the coast of Norway:

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A smooth, shining, and jet-black wall of water… speeding dizzily round with a swaying and sweltering motion, and sending forth to the winds an appalling voice, half shriek, half roar such as not even the mighty cataract of Niagara ever lifts up in its agony to Heaven.

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This account by a writer whose trade was to make the flesh creep illustrates how whirlpools conjure up visions of ships being lost forever in a vortex. In olden times, mariners understandably felt vulnerable, since their vessels were small and relatively unstable. Out of their fear grew legends about how whirlpools came into existence.

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One of the first legends to be recorded was that of Charybdis, a whirlpool in the Strait of Messina between the Italian mainland and the island of Sicily. In Homer’s Odyssey, written in the eighth century B.C., Charybdis is represented as a sea monster sucking and belching forth water as it preys on passing ships.

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10 Responses to “Magnificent Whirlpools and Maelstroms: The Nature’s Own Jacuzzis”
  1. ken bultman Says...

    On April 29, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Very interesting post and remarkable photos.


  2. ronthoughts Says...

    On April 29, 2010 at 8:46 pm

    Amazing write again my friend.
    Liked!
    SU’d!


  3. monica55 Says...

    On April 29, 2010 at 11:30 pm

    The Corryvreckan, looks just as you said: extremely dangerous, I would advice anyone to try it. Amazing find and a great write my friend.
    Monica.


  4. Susan Says...

    On April 30, 2010 at 3:01 am

    Excellent photos.


  5. Kate Smedley Says...

    On April 30, 2010 at 3:42 am

    Another wonderful article from you mrghaz, the pictures are stunning.


  6. mikky webs Says...

    On April 30, 2010 at 7:02 am

    Wonderful share with quality photos. Thanks a lot.


  7. Christine Ramsay Says...

    On April 30, 2010 at 7:14 am

    An outstanding article. You really are the master of these kinds of articles. This is so informative interesting and well illustrated.

    Christine


  8. Anuradha Ramkumar Says...

    On April 30, 2010 at 10:18 pm

    Wow…is the word I can think of when I read this one. Very informative.


  9. MELİSSA14 Says...

    On May 2, 2010 at 10:43 am


  10. revivor Says...

    On February 28, 2011 at 5:50 am

    missed this the first time round and looking at the pics – I wouldn\’t want to meet one of these in my canoe!!


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