Fantastically Bizarre, Strange, and Deadly Animals of the World

They are frightening, bizarre, and often mysterious creatures that we will never fully understand. However, according to conservationists and scientists, these species can get a bad rap for the wrong reasons.

In studies of Science, Zoology, and Marine Biology these species shed some new light. Their aggression and actions are based upon environment and predatory beings that are endangering their life spans. These particular species do not kill without ill will, they fight when their domain is threatened.

Wolves


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The ideals that wolves are aggressive is derivative of their particular habitat and the outsiders that step within that particular area. Contrary to popular belief, wolves tend to avoid hunting in their own  territory due to the possibility of deathly encounters with neighboring packs or other outside predators.

Black Mamba


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Black Mamba are highly venomous and dangerous. They are often said to be highly aggressive and nervous creatures, so when they feel that their being threatened, they will defend themselves. They are extremely fast and agile land movers, and are known to be one of the most dangerous snakes in the world.

The Great White Shark


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The population of Great whites is depleting everyday due to high numbers of poachers and fisherman. They are quite able to glide through the water at alarming speeds when approaching their feeding times. They will often catch their prey, and let it struggle to death before consuming it. Read more about the Great White here.

American Gator


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The American Alligator is typically found in the Southeastern United States, where it “inhabits wetlands that frequently overlap with human-populated areas.” There are dozens of venues in Florida that showcase the act of wrestling these beasts, which originated in the 20th century with the Seminole Tribe Indians.

Jellyfish


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Box Jellyfish


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Box Jellyfish are the most deadly creatures in the animal kingdom. Stings from these sea monsters are excruciatingly painful and can cause fatality in humans or other sea life. The mysteries of Box Jellyfish attacks are increasingly hard to understand considering they drift in the waters in packs, much like other comparable species. The Jellyfish we’re used to seeing (the top picture), are actually able to be sold at markets for consumption however, meeting these creatures in the open water in another story.

Narwhal


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Narwhals find themselves at the Arctic edge where they drift in and out of sliding glaciers, getting trapped for hours. Their unusual Ivory tusks, which are a form of sexual prowess,  were prized in medieval times as the unicorn horn and they are still hunted today by humans for their horns and meat.

Cane Toad


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The name “cane toad” was given to these large creatures due to their ability to eliminate pests in the cane crops in Central and South America. Their life span is assisted by their reproductive success, with the help of a healthy diet of dead and live food.

Tiger Salamander


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The Tiger Salamander is the largest land-dwelling salamander. They are also the most wide-ranging salamander species in North America with their short stubby legs, long tails, and spotted matrix of colors. They are normally found within the wetlands, however their numbers are dwindling due to ponds and other resources drying up.

African Wild Dog


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The scientific name “Lycaon Pictus’ is derived from the Greek for “painted wolf”. The genealogy is said to be a combination of jackal, hyena, and feral species. The name “Wild Dog”, is a disputed term by conversationalists stemming from a time that it’s ancestors ran rampant and caused destruction on farms and residences .

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74 Responses to “Fantastically Bizarre, Strange, and Deadly Animals of the World”
  1. Telscafe Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 7:17 am

    Sorry Lauren. I had difficulty eye-balling your terrific images.
    Ain’t that brave.


  2. C Jordan Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 7:19 am

    Well done Lauren. I gave this the thumbs up.


  3. CutestPrincess Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 8:14 am

    such a great article, i havent seen any of those animals here yet!


  4. CHAN LEE PENG Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 8:40 am

    Scary animals…thanks!


  5. rileyd Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 9:08 am

    I liked it.


  6. Darlene McFarlane Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:09 am

    Great read and very informative.

    I have never heard of the Narwhal before. They are a strange looking animal. They are all interesting and you have done an exceptional job of presenting it to us.

    Thank you.


  7. Dona Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:14 am

    This article would have been much beter, had the author known proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar.


  8. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:24 am

    “Cane toads are HIGHLY toxic, and are responsible for thousands of deaths to house pets such as dogs and cats. They are also an invasive species, as they were introduced to areas they were not native to. It is an ongoing effort for us zoologists to eliminate the cane toads from their UNnatural habitats.

    The tiger salamanders actually come in two morphogenic individuals. One is completely harmless and feeds on plants. The other is aggressive and cannibalistic towards the gentle tiger salamanders. The gentile salamanders are abundant when food is plentiful and water levels are high, the more aggressive morphs show up when the conditions are opposite.”

    I’m not trying to write another Wiki piece. If people want to educate themselves a bit more they can check out those Wiki pages. Are you from Triond by the way?


  9. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:26 am

    Much better? Dona
    Ironic!


  10. Moses Ingram Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:54 am

    A lot of good information here. Thanks for sharing.


  11. Mr Cool Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    A very interesting and informative article, I would like to know what makes these jellyfish more dangerous than any other animal with a potentially deadly sting or bite? Great article


  12. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    Hi Mr Cool,

    The box Jellyfish is really quite interesting. I do know that they are known to found in large groups but, so are many others. When they do happen to sting prey I believe it’s the amount of nematocysts which causes paralysis or such pain.


  13. Mercedes Selvira Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 2:08 pm

    Cool :) I hadn’t heard of Narwhals before either, and they are quite interesting. Thanks for including them.


  14. Betty Carew Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 2:09 pm

    Outstanding article Lauren, the pics are so awesome i didn’t notice any spelling mistakes lol (shame on me). Excellent article and very well written!


  15. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 2:23 pm

    Thank so much everyone for the delightful comments. I really knew nothing about Narwhals until I stumbled upon them on N. Geographic. They are quite mysterious.


  16. goodselfme Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 4:15 pm

    Narwhals, I always learn from your posts. Nicely presented as always.


  17. Bren Parks Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 4:35 pm

    AWESOME!!!! You rock, girl!


  18. Bren Parks Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 4:37 pm

    forgot to say…I LOVE wolves, though…lol

    What is frightening about them is that each one has a specific job and position to take when hunting….teamwork no less!


  19. Bo Russo Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 5:00 pm

    Really cool article Lauren,I too had never heard of the Narwhal thing,what a weird animal.I’m not trying to argue but I though the Austrailian Man’o war was the deadliest jellyfish.
    Those were some great pictures,and that wild African dog is really cool looking.Never heard of that before but it sure looks live one vicious dog.I love great white sharks,they are quite fascinating.I wanted to be a marine biologist and study them,but I didn’t qualify because you need a brain,and mine doesn’t work well.


  20. Bo Russo Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 5:03 pm

    That first wolf picture is awesome.


  21. Bo Russo Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 5:19 pm

    Went over and read the shark article,great stuff,I didn’t know how to comment so I came back over here,fantastic pictures too,especially when the shark was in mid air.


  22. Chambo Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 5:49 pm

    Well written and researched as always Lauren.


  23. Abdul Sabour Ayoubi Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 5:56 pm

    A great article with lots of useful information.


  24. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 6:04 pm

    Some changes are coming your way. The pics and text got mixed up on the jelly fish so that will be updated.

    Thanks BoJack, RJ, Abdul, Bren, and Goodselftime for the kind words.

    Bojack, I think that both Jellyfish are almost equally dangerous except that I assume that there are more reported attacks of the Box species. There were over 5655 stings in one year in Australia. Yikes!


  25. valli Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 7:31 pm

    Fascinating read.


  26. Juancav Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 9:09 pm

    Spectacular stuff,wonderful pictures and great reading,thank you.


  27. Chris Stonecipher Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 9:56 pm

    Lauren,
    Wonderful, informative and interesting read as always. I gave this a thumbs up and review on stumble. I will Digg it too! The African Wild Dog looks like a cross between a tiger and a dog.


  28. Fernando T. Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 10:26 pm

    Lol nice! I heard about the cane toads….wouldn’t be fun to be around them at their size…


  29. SundarRajkumar Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 10:54 pm

    different article.. good job.


  30. lanne Says...

    On January 19, 2009 at 11:52 pm

    Great article Lauren!! As a kid I was fascinated by whales and sharks so I did know about the narwhal, but that African Dog was a shocker!! Hate to meet up with one.


  31. Debra. Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 12:25 am

    This is an awesome article! Wherever did you get those stunning pictures of the wolf, the shark coming out of the water and the jellyfish? Very well done. :j

    God bless.


  32. Sakuragi Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 3:23 am

    I love animals. Thanks!


  33. denus Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 3:26 am

    once again top stuff lauren,,

    keep it up!

    Cheers,

    Denus


  34. nobert soloria bermosa Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 5:03 am

    interesting stuff about animals,i enjoyed this,thanks


  35. catlord Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 6:26 am

    I like the tiger salamander pics. The black w/ yellow spots variety I used to catch & keep as pets when I was a kid. Not familiar with the other one though…


  36. Lauren Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 8:12 am

    Sorry about that but, the corrections were made when I submitted and they are still not updated.


  37. Lost in Arizona Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 9:54 am

    Wonderful article. I once had a wolf-mix puppy in college, but had to take him to an animal refuge. Do to my misunderstanding of the species, his wild tendencies just did not make him a compatible pet. Just goes to show that humans do not always have the upper hand with animals, and we shouldn’t interfere with what we don’t understand. But to this day, I’ll never forget coming home from class and seeing what that dog had done to my apartment..lol!


  38. Majic Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 10:20 am

    I miss TV. I miss Animal planet! Thanks for the educational article!


  39. Christy Tuller Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 11:14 am

    Awesome article Lauren! Great research and I love the pictures, especially the toothy smile of the gator ;0)!


  40. Glynis Smy Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 11:56 am

    A very interesting piece. the Narwhal fascinated me. Pics were great.


  41. Darren Goad Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 5:56 pm

    Fun stuff. As a kid I thought that the origin of Gnarly came from the Narwhal


  42. Teresa Rose Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 8:17 pm

    Great article. I enjoyed reading it and my daughter thinks your pictures are cool. Though I would think that humans are the most deadly creatures in the animal kingdom. Those creatures mentioned above are only trying to survive and protect themselves from a very violent world. We are responsible for wiping out species and habitats for our own selfish and arrogant wants. We also kill for fun and sport. I am getting off the soapbox now(ha ha). Thanks for sharing. We loved it.


  43. unknownskills Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 9:56 pm

    This is a very interesting article. The pics are also very good! I love the pic of the wolf!


  44. L M Wilson Says...

    On January 20, 2009 at 10:23 pm

    Wow! Totally cool pics and a really interesting artical! ^^


  45. Michele Cameron Drew Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 12:10 am

    Great article, Lauren. I had heard of the narwhal but never seen photos, so it was an interesting look. Nicely done! :)

    -M


  46. Melissa Ryan Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 11:17 am

    loved the photos. Got scared at some of them.


  47. Enzo Silvestri Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 12:24 pm

    Very nice Lauren, however I reckon the Aussie crocodiles can whip a Florida alligator. heh
    Cane toads were imported as the answer to cane beetles in Queensland Australia, but they loved it so much they are now moving into the next state South. Loathsome creatures!


  48. Enzo Silvestri Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    Oh forgot to mention. Many predatory birds were dying from their poison but the Aussie Magpie and Crow worked out how to eat em. They learned to flip them over and peck out their innards that way, avoiding the poison glands


  49. Joni Keith Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 4:20 pm

    This is a great article, Lauren. I can see that you’ve put a lot of time and research into compiling it. Thanks for sharing. I’ve given it a thumbs up as well.


  50. Melody SJAL Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 6:50 pm

    Interesting, and quite deadly indeed. Thanks for a great read.


  51. Maria Blazz Says...

    On January 21, 2009 at 9:25 pm

    OMG, I wouldn’t like to be close any of them in the middle of the night ;)


  52. Patrick Bernauw Says...

    On January 22, 2009 at 5:25 am

    Wonderful pictures, amazing creatures… Liked it!


  53. Leroy Altman Says...

    On January 22, 2009 at 10:29 pm

    Awesome pictures and great article


  54. Leah Reyes Says...

    On January 23, 2009 at 3:17 pm

    Very well researched and interesting!


  55. R J Evans Says...

    On January 24, 2009 at 12:09 pm

    Great article! Hope you don’t mind but I have included it on my blog – Webphemera.

    You can find it at…

    http://www.webphemera.com/2009/01/fantastically-bizarre-strange-and_24.html

    There is a full back link to your Triond profile on the site and you can now stumble and digg this in its own respect! Thanks again!


  56. Tusaani Says...

    On January 24, 2009 at 1:14 pm

    Great pictures again! Very interesting.


  57. woody15 Says...

    On January 25, 2009 at 4:41 am

    Very knowledgable with great pictures that enhance the piece of writing.


  58. Guffin Mopes Says...

    On January 26, 2009 at 7:00 am

    whoa now, is the Narwhal a REAL animal? am I just completely clueless or what?


  59. Lauren Axelrod Says...

    On January 26, 2009 at 7:18 am

    Hi Guffen
    Yes, these are real animals. I saw a documentary on NG about them I was fascinated. Are these amazing or what?


  60. Cazz29 Says...

    On January 26, 2009 at 6:25 pm

    Your work is absolutely vital to the conservation and environmental movement and it’s a pleasure to see you’ve taken such a keen interest in this field of study. Please keep up the good work as a fine example to the rest of us.


  61. colette234 Says...

    On January 26, 2009 at 6:56 pm

    One of those jellyfish has a mean face. Good job on this one.


  62. wildcardWI Says...

    On January 27, 2009 at 2:41 pm

    I liked it! Great pics!


  63. hfj Says...

    On January 27, 2009 at 5:27 pm

    Great pictures and information. I’ve always been facinated with the black momba, considered to be one of the deadliest snakes in the world. Well done.


  64. Joe Dorish Says...

    On January 27, 2009 at 7:13 pm

    Hey Great Article Lauren!


  65. Bloodthunder Says...

    On January 28, 2009 at 9:21 am

    Very good Article and grat pictures.


  66. Jessica Rowe Says...

    On January 28, 2009 at 6:44 pm

    Great article and those pictures are awsome


  67. GrannaSue Says...

    On January 28, 2009 at 6:58 pm

    Thank goodness none of those creatures are in
    my backyard. I do feel for those losing their
    habitat, wonderful pictures, nicely written.


  68. nychik79 Says...

    On January 28, 2009 at 7:52 pm

    i really liked it..is a very interesting article..


  69. IreniaPehuajo Says...

    On January 29, 2009 at 8:04 am

    How interesting !!!


  70. eddiego65 Says...

    On January 29, 2009 at 11:57 pm

    Awesome article and pics.


  71. lostfairey24 Says...

    On January 30, 2009 at 12:15 pm

    thanks for all the info on these animals, it helped me learn about some animals that i didn’t know about. thank you


  72. Jake Mitchell Says...

    On February 5, 2009 at 6:24 pm

    My kids love these articles. Great pictures too!


  73. T B Forshaw Says...

    On February 22, 2009 at 5:23 am

    Fascinating article, i loved the salamander! (:


  74. Lostash Says...

    On June 13, 2009 at 1:51 pm

    Excellent! Dangerous can indeed mean misunderstood!


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