Tigers May Become Extinct in The Wild by 2022

A warning has been issued to the world in regards to one of the most iconic animals on the earth, the Tiger.

 

Tigers are the largest of the big cats, however their population numbers are not so impressive. Only a century ago over 100,000 Tigers stalked the forests of Asia, today there are less than 3,200, and already three subspecies are extinct (the Java, Bali, and Caspian). More tigers are alive in captivity (although not all in good condition) than remain in the wild.

File:Tiger map.jpg

photo source

Booming human populations throughout southern Asia have meant most natural habitat for tigers has been lost, deforestation and claiming land for agriculture has cost tigers their homes and hunting grounds. No prey = no tigers.

Growing economies are killing tigers. Poaching is a lucrative business as the Asian market still insists tiger parts are useful in alternative medicines and their pelts are still valued by collectors. Demands for resources mean tigers are pushed aside. The only way to turn the tide for tigers is to make saving them more valuable than destroying them, the areas where they live, and making sure they always have food sources.

A summit, taking place in Russia, and being hosted by PM Vladimir Putin, will define how well tigers survive. This summit wraps up November 24, 2010 and aims to improve the chances of survival in the wild for remaining tigers. Countries where tigers currently still exist naturally are Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Russia, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Remaining subspecies of tiger include the Bengal, Indochinese, Malayan, Siberian, South China, and Sumatran.

Until we turn the clocks for these animals, experts have given tiger populations until 2022. Ironically 2022 is also the Chinese Zodiac “Year of the Tiger”.

File:Panthera tigris sumatran subspecies.jpg

photo source

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15 Responses to “Tigers May Become Extinct in The Wild by 2022”
  1. Jaison Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 1:28 am

    Lovely creatures. It is a shame that even now illegal hunters hunt and kill these animals for their skin. It is great to see one in its natural habitat. In India, they are slowly taking steps to prevent extinction of these big cats.


  2. addjusting Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 2:08 am

    I think we must protect there habitat.


  3. eddiego65 Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 2:15 am

    It seems that is what humans are good at– destroy the world. As long as there’s still hope, we must protect the habitant of these wonderful creatures.


  4. tipsheetwriter Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 2:32 am

    sad :(


  5. drelayaraja Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 3:00 am

    Very pathetic indeed. India and other countries have to try more to increase the numbers…


  6. BluSphere Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 3:26 am

    Great article. Anyway there’s different opinions on this topic. You might know that we’ve killed a lot of tiger species around the globe and now we’re on our way to extinct some more. I heard that there were 30000 left and that some organizations (big ones) will do what they can to save these tigers.

    Yesterday, during lunch, I learn that their achievement was to have the amount of tigers doubled by 2022. But this might fail and you might be right, and tigers may become extinct in the wild by 2022.

    Thanks for sharing. Interesting as always, Mark G. B.

    Best regards,
    Blu


  7. lillyrose Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 6:26 am

    This is such a common occurrence nowadays with wild animals, it makes me sad. We need to really look at this problem seriously and stop think we are the most important living thing on earth.


  8. Michele Cameron Drew Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 7:32 am

    An excellent article Mark. Perhaps it is time for people to really take a step back and see what they are doing to the environment and the natural habitats of all of our beautiful creatures. So sad…
    Tweeted and FB shared..

    —M


  9. Starpisces Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 10:12 am

    and that pic above, the tiger also looks sad…
    I have never thought about this last time but after reading this, come to think about it, it is really serious. You have written this issue very well. By the way, 2022, that means the next cycle, seems like too soon,


  10. PSingh1990 Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 11:09 am

    Nice Share.

    :-)


  11. RAJEEV BHARGAVA Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 10:39 pm

    i completely agree with you 100%. this is truly an eye-opening article on the fate of the tigers. i could never have imagined that one day, a predicted date for their extinction would be given. it is now 2010 and this means that in 12 years they could be completely extinct. like you rightfully mention, we need to turn the clocks back for the tigers. i feel that they need to have more protection from humans to ward off poachers who do these cowardly acts to endanger them. the punishment in some countries for harming a tiger is death. thanks for sharing.


  12. Ruby Hawk Says...

    On November 22, 2010 at 11:10 pm

    Let’s hope something will prevent it ever happening.


  13. Jimmy Shilaho Says...

    On November 24, 2010 at 12:05 am

    I never would have realized the seriousness of this issue. Thanks for pointing it out.


  14. catocato Says...

    On November 30, 2010 at 8:32 pm

    I love tigers….. that sad I hope they don’t became extinct. They’re to pretty to be gone…….


  15. N. Sun Says...

    On December 11, 2010 at 6:15 pm

    Wow, I never knew that. That’s horrible. Thanks for sharing; maybe this will rise awareness so that more people can realize that one of the most popular animals in the world may go extinct. After all, without tigers, would there ever be Hobbes in Calvin and Hobbes?


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