Seven Top Scariest, Venomous Big Snakes

These snakes are both scariest and venomous animals. Some of them have extremely high toxic venoms which can stun and even kill their prey at once. They’re not only largest in size but also longest in length.

Black Mamba

Image source

Inhabiting in the areas of open woodlands, open savannahs, and rocky outcrops of Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Angola, South Africa, Kenya, Botswana, Ethiopia, Malawi, Uganda, Mozambique and Namibia, Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) has long been known as the longest venomous snake in Africa and the second longest dangerous snake in the world.  Their adults can reach to an average length of 2.5 meters or 8.2 feet and some of them can even grow to a length up to 4.3 meters or 14 feet.

Image source

Even though it’s called “Black Mamba”, its entire body isn’t all in black; the name is particularly given for its inky black mouth. It may be in the color of metal, olive green, dark olive, grey brown and you can see a light band around the body of some of their species. Normally, their skin becomes to darken when they age. They rely upon external heat to regulate their body temperature just like other extant reptiles.

Black Mambas move extremely fast, that is, up to 19.5km/h or 12mph. No wonder, they’re regarded as the fastest snake in the world.

Vipera Berus

Image source  Image source

Dwelling in most of the Western Europe to as far as the Far East Asia, vipera berus, a type of venomous viper species, enjoys basking its thick body in dry sunny places. Even though its bite is extremely painful, it’s rarely fatal. Its adult can grow up to 60 cm in length with the largest ever found in Sweden with a length over 90 cm and the other one observed in France and Great Britain was said to achieve a maximum size of 80 to 87cm.

Agkistrodon Piscivorus

Image source  Image source

Discovered mainly in shallow and slow-moving lakes and streams, Agkistrodon piscivorus is a semi-aquatic viper which is primarily found in the eastern United States. Since it’s a venomous snake its bite can be potentially fatal. It feeds on fish and frogs, and it’s a good swimmer that is always observed successfully colonizing islands of both Gulf and Atlantic coasts.

Crotalus Oreganus

Image source  Image source

Crotalus oreganus is a Northern Pacific rattlesnake which is found primarily in parts of British Columbia, and north-western Mexico. This snake is often thought to be the most aggressive, notorious and venomous rattle snake in the U.S. It has a well-camouflaged under a log during a warm winter day and has shown its remarkable climbing and clinging skills in a tree. Wow, amazing!

Pseudechis

Image source Image source

Generally, Pseudechis refers to a black snake. It’s found inhibiting a variety habitat of arid areas and swampland in Papua New Guinea and in almost every part of Australia (excluding Tasmania). Its bite is potentially fatal and it’s no doubt a member of the dangerous snake species. Further, it’s capable of producing large amounts of venom. In the world, it’s regarded as the largest venomous snake but in Australia, it’s the second largest snake. The adult snake can grow up to 2.5 to 3 meters and its size actually exceeds the size of the Australian Taipan, Black Mamba and King Cobra.

Bushmaster

Image source  Image source

The Bushmaster, lachesis muta muta, is the largest thick-bodied venomous Pit Viper has an amazing record reaching up to 14 feet. It’s marked by its triangular shaped head and is capable of performing multiple bite strikes, injecting large amount of venoms, which are potentially deadly and dangerous to humans. Even its juvenile’s bite can be fatal. Earning itself a nasty reputation of a “cruel and fierce dude”, it can be seen throughout the regions of Guyana, Nicaragua, Panama, Trinidad and Brazil.

Oxyuranus scutellatus

Image source  Image source

Oxyuranus scutellatus is an extremely dangerous largest venomous snake dwelling primarily in tropical regions of the Northern Territory, including Melville and Bathurst Islands, and the West Kimberley’s of Western Australia and it’s also seen along the coast and nearby areas of Queensland. It’s said that one single Oxyuranus scutellatus bite can kill up to 12,000 guinea pigs. It’s characterized by its larger fangs, orange-brown iris, and light to dark brown above its body with paler sides. Its highly toxic venoms from the bite can result in vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, nausea, and headache. Often, the poison from its bite causes blurred vision accompanyied by convulsions, and in severe cases, one may become coma after being attacked by an Oxyuranus scutellatus. The bite too, can sometimes cause death.  

You might also like my related articles:

Now, you can read more of my content at my science blog ScienceQuest.

26
Liked it
32 Responses to “Seven Top Scariest, Venomous Big Snakes”
  1. giftarist Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 9:16 am

    Very interesting, well researched and well written. Great pics too. A well done article.


  2. Debra. Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 9:37 am

    Great article with some great info and pics, Chan! The viper snake looks down right wicked!


  3. Chris Stonecipher Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 10:26 am

    Hi Chan,
    I enjoyed reading your article. You have some scary snakes listed here!


  4. Chris Stonecipher Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

    BTW, bookmarked on Digg


  5. Christine Ramsay Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 10:42 am

    A very well presented and well researched article. Great work, Chan. Nice to see you back.

    Christine


  6. chellsy Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 1:16 pm

    im so scared of snake.


  7. monica55 Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 2:45 pm

    A very well developed and excellently presented article Chan. But I’m so scared of snakes that I had had to move along faster than normal. Keep sharing.
    Monica.


  8. Sourav Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 3:29 pm

    Very good post!


  9. CA Johnson Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 4:23 pm

    This is a great article. I didn’t know there were so many snakes. I have to admit these snakes are pretty scary.


  10. Goodselfme Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 5:14 pm

    Very well composed with great pics too.Thank you for a wonderful presentation.


  11. Mark Gordon Brown Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    I love snakes, cool little creatures. I once put my finger close to a Mamba’s mouth, it was behind glass at Reptile World in Drumheller Alberta. :)


  12. Mr Ghaz Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 7:36 pm

    a Black Mamba!? YIKES!! I don’t know what I’d have done if I see one..Great read, and pictures as always. Thanks Chan 8)


  13. valli Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 9:19 pm

    These are scary.


  14. Inna Tysoe Says...

    On February 18, 2010 at 11:41 pm

    Well researched & presented.

    Inna


  15. Eunice Tan Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 1:35 am

    Snakes are scary.Moreover if they are long, big and venomous. something we should beware of.


  16. deep blue Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 2:23 am

    Those are deadly snakes alright my friend. I could only appreciate most pythons since they seem therapeutic to behold. These types were the most prominent kind used in medicine for producing pain killers and anti hypertensive drugs. You have made another stunning post.


  17. sambhafusia Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 4:03 am

    Great share!! interesting and well expressed…


  18. qasimdharamsy Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 12:18 pm

    Great Post…well written….


  19. Melody SJAL Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 9:13 pm

    Truly scary creatures.


  20. Jenny Heart Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 10:36 pm

    Ugly and scary! Great informative article!


  21. Judy Sheldon Says...

    On February 19, 2010 at 11:12 pm

    Chan, you have written a well researched article about snakes, but you did not need to convince me. I was already scared of them. :-)


  22. Ruby Hawk Says...

    On February 20, 2010 at 2:43 pm

    These snakes look scary. We have rattlesnakes. cottonmouths,water moccacins,copperheads,corn snakes, and other poison snakes, besides all the non poison ones. I am not really afraid of them but I avoid them if at all possible.


  23. Joe Dorish Says...

    On February 22, 2010 at 8:34 am

    Scary snakes! Would not want to run into any of these guys!


  24. standingproud Says...

    On February 23, 2010 at 4:51 pm

    I have a passion for the snake, venomous or not ,a truly spectacular creature.
    Informative easy to comprehend article.
    Thank you,and the images are amazing


  25. papaleng Says...

    On February 24, 2010 at 1:48 pm

    Another well-researched and well-presented article. These are really venomous snakes though I never heard a few of them. Thanks for the Biology lesson, friend.


  26. Kate Smedley Says...

    On February 25, 2010 at 8:11 am

    These are scary without knowing more about them!! Excellent article yet again, even the pictures frighten me…!


  27. DriftingInsomnia Says...

    On March 13, 2010 at 1:54 pm

    I learned about a couple of the mentioned snakes, more or less the Black Mamba and how it got its name from that one show off Animal Planet. The others though such as the Bushmaster and Agkistrodon Piscivorus? I’d never even known they’ve existed without your mentioning of them! Thanks for this informative write.


  28. euphoric Says...

    On April 20, 2011 at 9:16 am

    Nice article. This one is so amazing … I like black mamba a lot .. I wish I can touch it someday . =)


  29. shahzadi queen Says...

    On May 12, 2011 at 2:33 pm

    i really scared to watch the pics


  30. business internships Says...

    On November 23, 2011 at 10:44 am

    the pictures are fear evoking.


  31. urmom Says...

    On March 1, 2012 at 2:55 pm

    i think ur supid!


  32. Kurgan Says...

    On May 5, 2012 at 1:10 pm

    Should look at the tipan, tiger snake, yellow bellied black snake, copper head and the brown snake if you ay interested in snakes.


Post Comment
comments powered by Disqus