Immortal Creatures

Animals that defy the inevitability of death, and literally stop the process of senescence.

I have been doing some research lately on the phylum of Cnidaria, which includes, in their common names, jellyfish, coral, sea pens, hydras, and animals of the like. This phylum contains some of the most primitive, diverse, and beautiful animals on this planet. It also has some of the strangest animals this planet has to hold. I will be presenting these eccentric animals and hope you will view them with awe and interest.

Remember, these animals are not “immortal”, but “biologically immortal”, meaning they can still die from accidents and being killed or destroyed. No animal is perfectly immortal. Some people say that the prospect of a possibly immortal creature disproves the Qur’an, a holy Islamic text that states that no living thing is immortal. Anyways, I have made several editions to this, hoping to reduce the reading difficulty of the content to the level of the common viewer. If you see any errors within this article, please tell me and I shall edit it accordingly.

Other than these biologically immortal animals, long various multi-cellular eukaryotes (have cells with nucleus) have been known to live for a very time, here with their longest known lifespan:

Plants

  • Great Basin Bristlecone Spine – 4,862 years
  • Fitzroya Cupressoides – 3,622 years
  • Fortingall Yew – 2,000 – 5,000 years (not verified)
  • Sacred Fig – 2,293 years, if the planting date of 288 B.C. is correct

Animals

  • Antarctic Sponge – 1,550 years (approx.)
  • Icelandic Cyprine – 405 years
  • Koi Fish – 215 years
  • Bowhead Whales – 210 years (unconfirmed)

The Secrets of Immortality

Now, you may be asking, “How do these animals actually become immortal?”. Well, the answer to this is quite astounding, as I will tell. Turritopsis Nutricula can achieve immortality by reverting back to a polyp, which is its larval stage, after become sexually mature. This cycle is called transdifferation, and theoretically, can be repeated indefinitely. It is the only known case of a sexually mature metazoan, which is basically an animal, changing back into a colonial, immature state.

On the other hand, Hydrae (plural of hydrozoans belonging to the genus Hydra) become immortal by other means. These animals do not undergo senescence, or the process of aging. They have a regenerative ability that can dilute poisons by going through the process of mitosis, or cell division, rapidly, if in need, so if they ever become poisoned, it is unlikely that they will die. Both of these creatures are found in the ocean.

16
Liked it
9 Responses to “Immortal Creatures”
  1. Cathal Buckley Says...

    On March 6, 2009 at 5:11 pm

    Nice work Kaio


  2. kaio ken x4 Says...

    On March 6, 2009 at 6:20 pm

    Thank you.


  3. Pooface Says...

    On April 7, 2009 at 4:03 pm

    WOW


  4. Pooface Says...

    On April 30, 2009 at 11:20 am

    You suck


  5. kaio ken x4 Says...

    On April 30, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    Pooface,

    You clearly show that your infantile and rudimentary mental capacity precede yourself. But do not feel alone, for most of the common public has fell to this epidemic of stupidity.

    For hebetuous fools like you to understand, a loose interpretation of what I’ve just said is, “Get a life.”


  6. gabrielle alvree goss Says...

    On July 15, 2009 at 3:25 pm

    are they vanpires?


  7. honeybunch Says...

    On August 26, 2010 at 2:38 pm

    What does the Quaran have to do with anything? As far as I can tell, mentioning it doesn’t accomplish anything except make me think you’re anti-Islam. Even as an atheist, that bothers me a bit.

    As for the rest of the article, that’s pretty cool. I found this article during a Google search after reading the article “Why Can’t We Live Forever?” in the September 2010 issue of Scientific American. It gives the Hydra and Turritopsis Nutricula as examples of immortal organisms, but does not explain why they are immortal. Thanks for the explanation!


  8. honeybunch Says...

    On August 26, 2010 at 2:43 pm

    That’s pretty cool. I found this article during a Google search after reading the article “Why Can’t We Live Forever?” in the September 2010 issue of Scientific American. It gives the Hydra and Turritopsis Nutricula as examples of immortal organisms, but does not explain why they are immortal. Thanks for the explanation!

    However, I have to ask. What does the Quaran have to do with anything? As far as I can tell, mentioning it doesn’t accomplish anything except make me think you might be anti-Islam. Even as an atheist, it kind of bothers me. It is a stain on an otherwise interesting article.


  9. honeybunch Says...

    On August 26, 2010 at 2:44 pm

    Sorry about the double post. I thought the first one hadn’t gone through.


Post Comment
comments powered by Disqus