Tree Diversity: Quantitative Analysis of Forest Communities Results and Conclusions

A college level example of the results and conclusions sections of a lab report for a qualitative analysis of forest communities lab.

Results:

 Density

According to the class’ findings, the mean density in the old habitat was 0.217 and the standard deviation was 0.026, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 1. Table 1 and Figure 1 also show that the mean density in the new habitat was 0.207 and the standard deviation was 0.053. Overall, we can see in Figure 1 that the densities of the two habitats are almost equal; the old habitat may have a slightly higher density of trees overall.

Table 1

Old-Growth Forest

New-Growth Forest

Species

Diameter (m)

Density

Species

Diameter (m)

Density

Flowering Dogwood

1.27

0.220

American Beech

2.86

0.154

Sugar Maple

2.23

0.220

Northern Red Oak

29.92

0.154

White Pine

56.02

0.220

Red Maple

9.87

0.154

Sugar Maple

3.50

0.220

Red Maple

7.64

0.154

Sugar Maple

1.59

0.220

Red Panicle Dogwood

2.07

0.154

Sugar Maple

0.95

0.220

Black Ash

1.91

0.154

White Pine

48.70

0.220

American Beech

1.27

0.154

Sugar Maple

4.14

0.220

Panicle Dogwood

11.78

0.289

Sugar Maple

34.70

0.220

Red Maple

9.87

0.289

Sugar Maple

2.55

0.220

Red Maple

21.80

0.289

White Pine

18.78

0.206

Northern Red Oak

1.59

0.289

Red Maple

5.09

0.206

Northern Red Oak

1.27

0.289

Panicle Dogwood

2.23

0.206

Red Maple

13.37

0.289

Panicle Dogwood

1.59

0.206

Panicle Dogwood

1.59

0.289

American Beech

18.78

0.206

Panicle Dogwood

1.75

0.289

American Beech

21.65

0.206

Panicle Dogwood

2.07

0.289

White Pine

50.60

0.206

Panicle Dogwood

2.55

0.289

White Pine

57.61

0.206

Panicle Dogwood

2.23

0.289

Sugar Maple

19.42

0.206

Northern Red Oak

17.50

0.289

Northern Red Oak

28.01

0.206

White Pine

54.11

0.289

Sugar Maple

5.41

0.239

Paper Birch

16.23

0.289

Sugar Maple

5.73

0.239

Red Ash

8.69

0.196

Sugar Maple

3.69

0.239

Red Ash

6.69

0.196

American Beech

18.63

0.239

American Beech

6.05

0.196

American Beech

11.46

0.239

Red Maple

5.51

0.196

Sugar Maple

33.98

0.239

American Elm

1.78

0.196

Sugar Maple

62.42

0.239

Red Oak

23.09

0.196

Live Oak

2.23

0.239

Dogwood

1.27

0.196

Live Oak

5.57

0.239

Red Oak

17.68

0.196

White Pine

65.61

0.239

American Beech

1.59

0.196

Red Ash

14.49

0.239

White Pine

70.03

0.168

American Beech

1.91

0.232

Red Maple

25.15

0.168

American Beech

2.07

0.232

Red Maple

11.46

0.168

Red Ash

3.34

0.232

Red Maple

3.18

0.168

E. White Pine

56.66

0.232

“R Ash”

1.27

0.168

Sugar Maple

1.59

0.232

“R Ash”

0.96

0.168

Sugar Maple

2.23

0.232

“R Ash”

1.27

0.168

Sugar Maple

3.18

0.232

“R Ash”

0.96

0.168

Sugar Maple

4.11

0.232

Red oak

19.42

0.205

E. White Pine

52.04

0.232

beech

1.59

0.205

Apple Tree

2.35

0.232

beech

2.23

0.205

Sugar Maple

3.66

0.232

Red oak

32.79

0.205

Sugar maple

1.59

0.231

beech

1.59

0.205

Sugar maple

4.46

0.231

beech

3.18

0.205

beech

2.86

0.231

red oak

23.55

0.205

white pine

66.85

0.231

sugar maple

24.83

0.205

red ash

3.18

0.231

Buckthorn

2.39

0.155

beech

4.46

0.231

Buckthorn

1.59

0.155

beech

3.82

0.231

Buckthorn

2.07

0.155

beech

2.86

0.231

Oak

27.07

0.155

white pine

38.52

0.231

Dogwood

1.43

0.155

Sugar Maple

2.87

0.155

Dogwood

1.59

0.155

Sugar Maple

5.73

0.155

Red Maple

13.38

0.155

Sugar Maple

0.64

0.155

Mean Density

0.207

Beech

5.73

0.155

Standard Dev.

0.053

Dogwood

1.27

0.155

Av. DBH

10.539

Sugar Maple

2.23

0.155

Sugar Maple

1.59

0.155

Mean Density

0.217

Standard Dev.

0.026

Av. DBH

15.353

DBH

T-test= 0.15     Based upon the data and the t-test, we can assume that there is not a significant tree size difference between the two habitats. The t-test gave us a value of 0.15, which is also considered the p-value. When the calculated p-value is greater than 0.05, such as in this case, we accept the null hypothesis. The null hypothesis says that any difference in tree size in the two habitats is a result of chance, meaning that there is not a significant difference in tree size in the two habitats.

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