Edible Wild Plants of North America: Acacia and Abal

The edible wild plants of North America frequently have medicinal value as well.

North America includes countries like the Bahamas, Canada, Jamaica, Nicaragua and the United States. These plants are found in many different habitats. The edible flora may survive in sandy deserts in the United States as well as tropical rainforest environments.

Edible Flowers: Abal

Abal (Calligonum comosum) is one of the plants in North America that has edible flowers. It grows in shady deserts and is not very tall. It usually grows to about 1.2 meters. It produces flowers during March and April.

Abal Medicinal Uses

Abal is used to treat microbial infections, especially Listeriosis. Listeriosis is a severe food borne disease that affects humans and animals. It has a high mortality rate even when antibiotics are used against it in the early stages of the disease. Studies have shown that compounds extracted from the plant can inhibit the growth of Listeria ivanovii. These lab results indicate the bioactive extracts can control food contamination.

Edible Leaves and Pods: Acacia

Acacia is one of the plants in North America that has edible leaves and pods. People can safely consume these cooked or raw. It likes open, sunny spaces and is frequently found in the tropics.

Acacia Medicinal Uses

Acacia produces gum in the pods and this gum has been used for medicinal purposes for a number of years. People usually get the gum from the plan by crushing the leaves and pods.

People use acacia gum for the following purposes:

  • Food: gum acacia has been used by people in different cultures as food. It is very nutritious and in times of famine, six ounces of it can support an adult for 24 hours.
  • Treating periodontitis: acacia gum is used to kill the bacteria that contribute to gum disease. The gum must be added to water and then this solution should be used as a mouth wash.
  • Bring relief from colds and sore throats: a mouth wash made with acacia gum can help to bring relief from sore throats and the symptoms of colds
  • Treating wounds: acacia gum can be used to soothe small scrapes and cuts. It covers and protects areas that are inflamed.
  • Treating inflammatory conditions: people may dilute gum acacia in water and drink it as a tea. It brings relief from diarrhea, dysentery, and inflammation of the urinary tract.

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Edible wild plants

English: arabic gum resin Italiano: gomma arabica resina grezza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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25 Responses to “Edible Wild Plants of North America: Acacia and Abal”
  1. yes me Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 2:44 pm

    Cheers for the ups on this Sharifa cheers


  2. lauralu Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 2:45 pm

    good share thanks


  3. girishpuri Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 3:04 pm

    useful share


  4. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 4:42 pm

    Cheers Matt ;-)


  5. Safa Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 4:43 pm

    Learned something new..thanks for the great share..


  6. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 4:59 pm

    You’re welcome Lauralu


  7. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 5:02 pm

    Thanks Girish


  8. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 5:04 pm

    You’re welcome Safa.


  9. KittyK Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 8:01 pm

    I was not aware of this…thanks for the lesson!


  10. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 3, 2012 at 8:11 pm

    You’re welcome Kitty.


  11. Starpisces Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 12:36 am

    You are very knowledgeable, Sharifa, I learn a lot from your posts, including this, now I know what plant I can eat… :)


  12. rajaryanme Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 1:20 am

    Learned something new..thanks for the great share..


  13. Eunike Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 4:25 am

    Informative article


  14. Sunjhini Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 5:30 am

    wonderful share


  15. sabio47 Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 6:28 am

    Impressive one …..

    http://tanzy.blogspot.com


  16. akinyemmy Says...

    On June 4, 2012 at 1:31 pm

    An informative share


  17. Fleur D Says...

    On June 7, 2012 at 1:44 am

    This was a really good article. I really learned something new.I lam always looking for natural remedies instead of pills. I saw a book on edible wild plants but haven’t read it on my Kindle.I would have liked a picture of the abal plant. I will share this on FB and Twitter and my blog at http://www.bkwormmomma.blogspot.com. Thanks.


  18. avissado Says...

    On June 7, 2012 at 4:20 pm

    hey I was completely ignorant about this. thanks for the info and especially for including pictures always gives a better understanding. cheers


  19. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 7, 2012 at 4:43 pm

    Cheers


  20. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 7, 2012 at 4:45 pm

    Thanks Fleur


  21. SharifaMcFarlane Says...

    On June 7, 2012 at 4:46 pm

    @Akinyemmy & Sabio
    Thanks


  22. evcalangian Says...

    On June 16, 2012 at 6:36 pm

    Very informative. Thank you.


  23. Raj the Tora Says...

    On June 19, 2012 at 1:27 am

    It is new news, will be helpful for the coast-ridden sailors :)


  24. jennifer eiffel01 Says...

    On June 19, 2012 at 10:10 am

    I live in North America and have never seen one of these plants


  25. jennifer eiffel01 Says...

    On June 19, 2012 at 10:11 am

    I live in North America and have never seen one of these plants.


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