Unusual Aurora Activity

If you have seen the northern lights, you know what a spectacular show they provide, but this year, because of recent hectic solar flare activity, these fantastic lights being seen unusually far south in North America.

If you have seen the northern lights, you know what a spectacular show they provide, but this year, because of recent hectic solar flare activity, these fantastic lights being seen unusually far south in North America, surprising the experts and giving those sky-watchers an unexpected bonus treat.

The show was spotted down through Arkansas, Kentucky and Georgia as excited spectators reported sightings to local TV stations, whilst an = automated NASA camera  in Huntsville, Alabama captured 20 minutes of the vibrant red and green aurora borealis that was described as.

the most vivid ever seen over a 20 minute period.

This is only the second time this century that northern lights have been seen this far south, federal Space Weather Prediction Centre officials in Boulder, Colorado, saying that they were surprised, given the size of the solar storm involved.

The storm being only considered moderate, the lights probably should not have been visible so far south of Iowa, though the storm in question was unusual, in that the effects reached Earth eight hours faster than had been forecast, making the timing perfect for that spectacular US show.

Peak intensity happened as it grew dark over North America, added to which the skies were clear. An aurora happens because of magnetic solar winds hitting Earth’s magnetic field and compressing it. This excites oxygen and nitrogen electrons which emit red and green colors as they calm down again.

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5 Responses to “Unusual Aurora Activity”
  1. AmosTheCat Says...

    On October 26, 2011 at 7:55 pm

    Spectacular!!!


  2. Aroosa Hermosa Says...

    On October 27, 2011 at 4:23 am

    good


  3. Socorro Lawas Says...

    On October 27, 2011 at 10:14 am

    Heavens! What a beautiful sight!


  4. Jacques Berkeley Says...

    On October 27, 2011 at 11:44 am

    Wild stuff! When is the aurora expected to peak?


  5. Jacques Berkeley Says...

    On November 22, 2011 at 8:22 pm

    “An aurora happens because of magnetic solar winds hitting Earth’s magnetic field and compressing it. This excites oxygen and nitrogen electrons which emit red and green colors as they calm down again.”

    Read more: http://scienceray.com/astronomy/unusual-aurora-activity/#ixzz1eU1zfQIe

    I wasn’t aware of these specifics. Enjoyed the article.


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